Post your project topics here

Post your project title and one sentence description here

Post your project title and one sentence description here

by Tony deLaubenfels -
Number of replies: 11

Just reply to this message. One post per team. Include team members names. Due by the end of the day on Friday. 5 pts. possible.

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

Chaos, Fractals, and Rubix Cubes

by Caleb Wilson -
 A striking similarity between topics we have discussed in class and a simple 3 x 3 rubix cube expose many of the complex mathematical concepts of world-renowned toy. Ideas like the Menger Sponge, chaos theory, and others can be seen in this colorful cube. 
In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

The Mind and Fractals of M.C. Escher

by Eliza Thompson -

Maurits Cornelis Escher was one of the greatest artists of the 20th century, and his work often portrayed the natural world as a mathematically complex, self-similar object. 

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

The Bob Ross of Fractals

by Georgia Gump -

This presentation explores the ways in which artists employ fractals and other techniques to render surprisingly realistic images of nature in a variety of mediums. 

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Fractals Around Us and Inside of Us

by Ici Collier -

Jose, Marcelo, and I will be discussing the topic of fractals around us and inside of us, specifically dealing with animals (Peacocks, sea urchins, starfish, and the human body, and seeing if they have anything in common.

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

Re: Post your project title and one sentence description here

by Lizz Chapman -

Demonstrating how artists make self similar paintings along with chaotic functions, representing bifurcations and how the results can seem chaotic. 

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Proof of the Emotional Quality of Fractals and Chaos

by Cassie Gill -

Leena, Brian and I will be designing and analyzing the play Proof by David Auburn. We will be exploring how to incorporate fractals and chaos within the set, costume and sound design of this show in addition to crafting a full directorial approach. 

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

Measuring Dimensions of Natural Objects

by Kurt Blankenheim -

Owen and I will be exploring the box counting method to determine dimensions of natural occuring objects on the earth. We are thinking about finidng irregular rocks, snad, tree branches, cracks in concrete, fruits, grass, etc....Then explaning how it compares to normal geometric shapes as we did in class.

In reply to Kurt Blankenheim

Re: Measuring Dimensions of Natural Objects

by Tony deLaubenfels -

Excellent! This will be challenging--be sure to start small and have some success before you move to anything more challenging.

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

Re: Measuring Dimensions of Natural Objects

by Kurt Blankenheim -

Yes, we are planning to just work on some smaller and more regular shaped objects that we find first and use the same box counting method as we have in class and once we start to master finding the dimensions we can move on to more complex shapes and jagged objects. Perfect.

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

Re: Post your project title and one sentence description here

by Andrew Hanson -

Joe and I will be examining how changing the way we view the mandelbrot set can create incredible visual complexity and surprising visual similarities to buddha.

In reply to Tony deLaubenfels

Re: Post your project title and one sentence description here

by Mickey Hines -

Colton, Cheyenne and I will be doing our project on using software to generate fractal planets.